Customer Service: (802) 244-0883 | Retail Store: (802) 651-4100

Information

  • Nikon Df Is Now In-Stock!

    Nikon Df Digital SLR Camera

     

    We recently wrote about the Nikon Df being announced in a previous post. That was at the beginning of November. It seems like ages since then, but we are happy to report that the Nikon Df is now in stock!

    We have the Nikon Df in four different configurations. They are all in stock at the time of this writing, but we anticipate selling out of them quickly. Nikon was unable deliver all of the cameras we ordered, so we still have some backordered, which usually means Nikon is not going to be able to keep up with demand. The silver Nikon Dfs seem to be in tighter supply than the blacks, and the silver body only configuration in tighter supply than all the others.

    Here's what we've got: Nikon Df body only in silver, Nikon Df body only in black, Nikon Df with special edition 50mm f/1.8G in silver, and Nikon Df with special edition 50mm f/1.8G in black.

    If you live local to one of our retail stores in Waterbury Center or South Burlington, VT, please stop on by and check out the Nikon Df. We have the black with special edition lens on display and for demonstration at both stores.

    The Nikon Df takes Secure Digital (SD) cards, so, if you don't have one and you are ordering this camera, make sure to pick one up at the same time. The Nikon Df does not shoot video, but it is still recommended to have a high-speed card for transferring the large files this camera produces, and for if/when the camera is used in continuous shooting mode (it can shoot up to 5.5 frames/second).

  • Nikon D5300 vs. D5200: What’s the difference?

    We take a closer look at the differences of the Nikon D5300 and D5200

    Customers are constantly asking us, “what’s the difference”? There are a lot of great products out there, and product features often overlap. Is one brand better than the other? Is one product better than another? The answer is not often an easy, definitive “this one’s better”. There are many aspects and features of a product that will require taking a closer look. In addition, each individual person has different requirements, so not all products are the same to each person.

    The issue gets especially blurred when new products are made. And beyond that, camera makers now have the tendency of keeping older products around for longer. When a new product comes out, the old product is discounted, and kept in the line-up. The tendency used to be to completely discontinue a product, and take it off the shelves, so there was less confusion when making a choice. Newer was better, and that was all you could get. Now, newer may be better, but the older model may be good enough, and the lower price tag is always attractive.

    The new Nikon D5300 and the now older D5200 are perfect examples of this problem at large. We know the D5200 is going to be cheaper, and the D5300 should be better, but “what’s the difference”? It’s not until we take a closer look at the main differences that we can make an informed decision. So let’s take a closer look.

    Image Sensor

    24.2 Megapixels (D5300) vs. 24.1 Megapixels (D5200)

    For a digital camera, the image sensor is a huge part of the equation when making a purchasing decision. Unlike a roll of Kodak Gold 200 film that would be the same from camera to camera, image sensors and the quality of the picture produced by that sensor differ in almost every incarnation of a model line. The easiest difference to spot is megapixel count. In the case of the Nikon D5300 and D5200 they’re essentially the same. Unfortunately, that information alone is not helpful, but let’s take a closer look.

    The D5300 is missing the Optical Low Pass Filter (OLPF) that is typically placed in front of the image sensor. The D5200 still has the OLPF in tact. We first saw Nikon removing the OLPF from the D800E. The Nikon D800 actually has the OLPF, but the D800E does not. This is true with the D5300 and the D5200 too. What is an OLPF, and what is the big deal anyway?

    The OLPF is used to slightly soften an image. You would think that with a high-resolution image sensor you’d want to keep things sharp. To avoid issues with moire, however, camera makers place a filter in front of the image sensor to ever so slightly blur the image. Moire is an effect caused when the pattern in a subject is overlapped with the pattern of an image sensor’s pixels, and you get a strange, additional patterned effect. Well, with high-resolution image sensors, you certainly would like to keep things sharp, so Nikon has started to remove the OLPF. There are really not many situations where moire will be an issue, and with modern software, this issue can often be resolved post-processing. The benefit is ever-so-sharper images.

    If you take pictures of intricate textiles or patterns of colors and shapes, the absence of an OLPF will be a definite downside. For most other situations, the D5300 is going to be a sharper choice.

    OLPF Moire Effect Comparison This image was taken directly from Nikon's website. Here you can see how intricate patterns can create a moire effect when with the absence of an OLPF.

    Processing Engine

    EXPEED 4 (D5300) vs. EXPEED 3 (D5200)

    Along with the image sensor is the image-processing engine. Image processors are small, specialized computers that take all of the information recorded by the camera’s image sensor and turn that into a (hopefully) beautiful picture. Each incarnation of a model line typically has an improved processor. This usually translates into a faster camera, better video, increased low-light (better ISO) performance, etc.. Nikon’s EXPEED 4 is an improvement over the EXPEED 3. One of the biggest benefits includes 1080 60p HD video. The D5200 has 1080 60i HD vdieo.

    Video

    1080 60p HD (D5300) vs. 1080 60i HD (D5200)

    Although the Nikon D5200 is capable of shooting progressive 1080 HD video at lower frame rates, the D5300 expands the video shooting capability of the product line by featuring progressive HD video at 60 frames per second. The D5200 is capable of 60 frames per second too, but the video is interlaced.

    Interlaced video is essentially video with half the resolution, but shown twice to get full resolution. One frame of video is essentially split in two. One frame will feature even lines of a picture, while another frame will feature odds. When the frames are flashed quickly on a screen, one after the other, the human eye perceives the image as having full resolution, not separate frames of alternating lines of resolution. This usually works out fine, until there’s action. When watching fast moving objects you can observe “artifacts” with interlaced video. It will look like the moving object is slightly blurred at the edges and has horizontal lines through it. Progressive video displays every line with each frame, so there is no potential for artifacting. The overall quality will look much better, especially when viewed on bigger TVs or screens.

    Interlaced Video Example of Fast Moving Object This photo is courtesy of Wikipedia. It shows the artifacts of interlaced video, especially for moving objects.

    Wi-Fi

    Built-in (D5300) vs. WU-1a Adapter (D5200)

    The Nikon D5300 and D5200 are both capable of connecting to Wi-Fi, but the D5300 has it built-in. The D5200 requires an adapter, the Nikon WU-1a, which is an additional $60 purchase.

    Wi-Fi in these cameras is really cool, and for at least two reasons. The first is for being able to share images quickly and easily. The smartphone camera has become wildly popular for several reasons, but a big part of it is being able to easily and instantly share images on social networks. The only problem with smartphone cameras is that the quality of the images is still lacking overall. The Wi-Fi capability of the D5300 and D5200 with the optional WU-1a, allows you to connect to your smartphone to share your images instantly like you would with pictures taken by your smartphone. This is a win-win. Instant sharing, plus exceptional image quality.

    Another benefit of Wi-Fi is being able to control these cameras remotely. Although this benefit is used less often, it is pretty cool that you can control the cameras from your smartphone. I know of a customer who set their camera on a tripod near a hummingbird feeder and went around the corner of his house. He was able to capture some amazing pictures of the birds by snapping away from his smartphone, and didn’t have to worry about scaring the birds away.

    In addition to Wi-Fi being built in, the D5300 also features built-in GPS. Again, the D5200 is capable of GPS, but requires a Nikon GP-1A adapter, which is an optional accessory that costs over $200. GPS can be really cool. Each image capture can record and save the GPS coordinates of the location where the image was taken. You’ll never forget where you took a picture again. Using Google Maps or Nikon’s software you can view on a map the locations of each of your recorded shots.

    Build/Construction

    Monocoque design (D5300) vs. More traditional structure (D5200)

    The Nikon D5300 is even smaller and lighter than the already light and compact D5200. This is due to the monocoque design of the D5300. What exactly does this mean? Think of a monocoque structure as like an exoskeleton. Instead of the insides supporting the structure of the outside, the outsides help to give the overall structure support and durability. The D5300 uses some specialized materials and design in its outer coverings to reduce joints and increase the support and durability of the camera, all the while reducing its overall weight and size. The D5200 weighs approximately 555g to the D5300 at 530g.

    Final Thoughts

    Overall there’s no doubt that the D5300 is an improvement over the D5200. In addition to the differences noted above, the D5300 has a bigger, higher resolution LCD screen. It is 3.2” and a 1037k dot resolution screen over the D5200’s 3” and 921k dot resolution screen. The D5300 also added a couple more picture (art) modes, which include Toy Camera Effect and HDR Painting.

    The biggest features to stand out are the removal of the OLPF and the built-in Wi-Fi. Right now there isn’t really a big difference in price. Actually, the starting prices are the same. The D5200 has been on sale for $100 off, however, and we assume this will only increase. Are these features worth $100 or more? It depends on what you are using the camera for and how these features meet your needs. If you are going to use it, the built-in Wi-Fi saves you $60 for that feature, and the GPS will save you more. If you want the best resolution possible, and are not afraid of some moire at times, the D5300 will be tack sharp. Whatever you decide, both cameras will overall take great pictures.

  • Canon Develops New Dual Pixel CMOS AF Technology

    Canon EOS 70D Digital SLR Camera

    Canon Develops New Dual Pixel CMOS AF Technology To Significantly Improve Autofocus Performance During Live View And Video Shooting

     

    MELVILLE, N.Y., July 2, 2013 – Canon U.S.A., Inc., a leader in digital imaging solutions, today announced its parent company, Canon Inc., developed Dual Pixel CMOS AF, an innovative new autofocus technology for the EOS 70D Digital SLR camera. Dual Pixel CMOS AF, a phase-detection AF technology conducted directly on the image sensor plane, employs a CMOS sensor on which all of the effective pixels are able to perform both imaging and phase-detection AF simultaneously to achieve dramatically improved AF performance over prior EOS cameras during Live View and video shooting.

     

     

    Dual Pixel CMOS AF
    Dual Pixel CMOS AF logo
    Dual Pixel CMOS AF structure

    As digital SLR cameras have evolved in recent years in terms of functionality and performance, shooting styles have become more diverse. An increasing number of users no longer rely exclusively on the viewfinder when shooting, but rather view the camera's LCD monitor when using the Live View function to capture still images and when shooting video.

    Canon's newly-developed Dual Pixel CMOS AF is an innovative new image-plane phase-detection AF technology that employs a CMOS sensor on which all of the effective pixels are able to perform both imaging and phase-detection AF simultaneously. Each individual pixel (the smallest structural unit capable of outputting an image signal) on the CMOS sensor incorporates two independent photodiodes (elements that transform light into electrical signals) which output signals that can be used for both imaging and the phase-detection AF. When using the EOS 70D Digital SLR camera's Live View function, the technology enables autofocusing with ease, flexibility, speed and accuracy similar to shooting through the viewfinder, enabling sharp focus to be obtained across a wide shooting area1 through phase-detection AF2 until final focus is achieved. Compared with earlier generations of Canon's image-plane phase-detection AF3, Dual Pixel CMOS AF realizes shorter focusing times, outstanding tracking performance and smoother autofocusing during video shooting. And, because Live View shooting can be used in a manner similar to using the camera's viewfinder, the fast and smooth AF performance allows users to concentrate more attention on the subject and composing the photo when shooting.

    Compared with the EOS Rebel SL1, which employs Hybrid CMOS AF II, the EOS 70D Digital SLR camera (scheduled to go on sale in September 2013), which is the first camera to feature Dual Pixel CMOS AF, not only achieves AF speed that is approximately 30 percent faster4 but also delivers improved Movie Servo AF tracking for continuously smooth focusing during video shooting, even when filming quickly moving subjects.

    Because the outstanding AF performance of Dual Pixel CMOS AF is made possible with 1035models of EF lenses (including many earlier models and models available outside of Japan), users can enjoy a wide range of photographic endeavors achievable with various lenses.

    Recognizing great potential for the application of this technology across diverse product categories, Canon aims to promote its development efforts in the field of AF technology, targeting further advances to contribute to expanding the world of photographic expression.

    How Dual Pixel CMOS AF Works

     

    How Dual Pixel CMOS AF Works.

    Reference information

    Phase-detection AF
    With conventional phase-detection AF, the light that enters through the photographic lens is divided into two images. The difference in the focus point position between the two images is measured on a dedicated AF sensor rather than the image sensor itself, enabling the camera to determine the direction and amount of lens adjustment required to obtain proper focus. Because phase-detection AF enables fast focusing performance compared with contrast-detection AF, the technology is widely employed in digital SLR cameras, mainly for viewfinder shooting.

    Dual Pixel CMOS AF employs the same measurement principle as a dedicated AF sensor, except that it is carried out directly with the image sensor. Its large coverage area enables smooth and reliable image-plane phase-detection AF for both still images and video with no reliance on dedicated AF sensors or contrast-detection AF.

    Contrast AF
    Contrast AF is an autofocus method employed in compact digital cameras and video camcorders, as well as conventional digital SLR cameras for Live View shooting. Because contrast is highest when an image is in proper focus, the camera analyzes the contrast information from the image on the image sensor, adjusting the lens until the maximum contrast value is reached. While contrast AF offers high focusing accuracy, it tends to require more time compared with phase-detection AF because the focusing components of the lens must be driven during AF measurement to find the point of peak contrast.

    Hybrid CMOS AF and Hybrid CMOS AF II
    Hybrid CMOS AF is an AF method employed in the EOS Rebel T5i Digital SLR camera and the EOS M digital camera that delivers enhanced focusing speed during Live View shooting and when shooting video. Combining fast phase-detection AF and high-accuracy contrast AF, Hybrid CMOS AF makes possible faster focusing performance than contrast AF alone, quickly measuring the subject distance using a dedicated phase-detection AF image element embedded in the CMOS image sensor and completing the process with extreme accuracy using contrast AF. The EOS Rebel SL1 camera features Hybrid CMOS AF II, which makes use of an imaging sensor that supports AF across a wide area spanning approximately 80 percent of the shooting area measured vertically and horizontally.

    For more information about the development of Dual Pixel CMOS AF visit:http://usa.canon.com/gamechangeraf

  • Nissin Flash Compatibility Chart

    If you haven't heard of Nissin, they are a popular third-party flash manufacturer that manufactures flashes for use with Canon, Nikon, Sony, and more. Nissin offers high-quality alternatives to the original equipment manufacturer's flashes and replicates many of the same functions including TTL, plus Nissin adds some additional features not found in OEM flashes (like a color, auto-rotating display on the 866), and does all this at a discount to the comparable OEM model.

    Not all Nissin flashes are fully compatible with all cameras, however. There may be some limitations depending on your flash and camera combination. Nissin recently sent us an updated compatibility chart, and we thought it would be useful if we published it here:

    Nissin Flash Compatibility Chart

    We offer the full line of Nissin flashes in our retail store. If you have any questions regarding Nissin flashes, or would like to order one, please don't hesitate to contact us at sales@gmcamera.com or (802) 244-0883.

  • Nikon D800/D800E and D4 Firmware Upgrades

    Nikon has released new firmware upgrades for the D800, D800E and the D4. The main issue these firmware upgrades resolve is the "lock up" issue reported by PDN. Here's the full list of modifications this firmware upgrade provides for the D800/D800E:

    • When a still image was captured while viewing existing images in playback mode, the monitor turned off, the memory card access lamp glowed steadily, and, in some rare cases, the camera ceased to respond to operations. This issue has been resolved.
    • When the Wireless Transmitter WT-4 was used with certain settings applied, RAW images were also transferred when Wireless transmitter > Transfer settings > Send file as was set to JPEG only. This issue has been resolved.
    • A dark shadow sometimes appeared at the bottom edge of images captured with Active D-Lighting set to any option other than Off with Image area set to 5:4 (30x24). This issue has been resolved.

    The D4:

    • When a still image was captured while viewing existing images in playback mode, the monitor turned off, the memory card access lamp glowed steadily, and, in some rare cases, the camera ceased to respond to operations. This issue has been resolved.
    • When network functions were used with certain settings applied, RAW images were also transferred when Network > Send file as was set to JPEG only. This issue has been resolved.
    • When an option that utilized the main command dial was selected for Custom Setting f15: Playback zoom, and an image was zoomed in or out with playback with certain settings applied, shooting shutter speed, aperture, and exposure compensation settings were sometimes changed. This issue has been resolved.

    Click here to download the Nikon D800 firmware upgrade.

    Click here to download the D800E firmware upgrade.

    Click here to download the Nikon D4 firmware upgrade.

  • Olympus OM-D E-M5 Free Accessory Rebate Extended

    Olympus OM-D E-M5 Digital Camera

    In the middle of March we reported Olympus was running a promotion for a free accessory with the purchase of an OM-D E-M5. That promotion has been so successful Olympus has had a difficult time keeping up with orders. All of the accessories, as well as the cameras, have had heavy backorders leaving many customers disappointed. Olympus understands the frustration of these customers and has extended the promotion through the end of June to allow customers who wanted to take advantage of the promotion to have a chance.

    Here's the new, extended date rebate form.

  • Nikon D3100, D3200 and D5100 -- What's the difference?

    Nikon D3100, D3200 and D5100 Comparison

    With the recent release of the Nikon D3200 a lot of customers are wondering how it fits into the current lineup of Nikon digital SLR cameras. The first question most customers have are, "Is the Nikon D3100 being replaced?" No. The Nikon D3100 is Nikon's entry level digital SLR at an entry level price tag. Right now, including instant savings, the Nikon D3100 is selling for only $549.95, and that's including an 18-55mm VR lens. The Nikon D3200 is being pegged also as an entry-level camera, but with the horsepower of a higher-resolution 24.2MP image sensor. The current price of the Nikon D3200 is $699.95, including an 18-55mm VR lens.

    Perhaps the bigger mystery surrounds the Nikon D5100. The base price of the Nikon D5100 is higher than the Nikon D3200. The D5100 currently rings up with a base price of $849.95. There is currently an instant savings on the Nikon D5100, however; which puts the D5100 at the same price as the Nikon D3200--$699.95. So, the question we've been receiving is, "If both the Nikon D5100 and D3200 are the same price, what camera should I get?" This is a difficult question to answer with one sweeping response. It depends. Some people will be instantly drawn to the higher-resolution of the Nikon D3200. Others will hesitate and wonder what else is under the hood? For those who are looking for a more detailed comparison, we offer the following information. We hope this helps.

    The Nikon D5100 and D3200 both have:

    • Up to 4 frames-per-second continuous shooting
    • 11 auto-focus points
    • 1080p HD video recording
    • 3" 921,000 dot monitor (D5100 screen can flip out)
    • 1/4,000 to 30 second shutter speeds

    The Nikon D3200 has a ~24MP image sensor with EXPEED 3 processing, and the Nikon D5100 has a ~16MP image sensor with EXPEED 2 processing.

    The Nikon D3200 offers on-screen audio levels as well as the ability to shoot 1280x720 HD video at 60 frames-per-second.

    The Nikon D3200 shoots 12-bit RAW, and has a estimated battery life of 540 shots. The Nikon D5100 shoots 14-bit RAW files, and has an estimated battery life of 660 shots.

    The Nikon D5100 has a more customize-able "Active D-Lighting", whereas the Nikon D3200 is either On or Off.

    The Nikon D5100 has an ISO range that is expandable to 25,600, and the Nikon D3200 is half that at 12,800. The D5100 also offers 1/3 stop ISO increments.

    The Nikon D5100 features a greater range of scene modes as well as "Effects" that can work in both stills and video.

    The Nikon D5100 features the ability to create a multiple exposure image, and also offers in-camera HDR (high dynamic range).

    The Nikon D5100 offers interval timer shooting in-camera, and also features a full Custom Settings menu. The D3200 has some custom settings that may be set in the Setup menu.

    As you can see, the Nikon D5100 features an all-around more advanced experience than the D3200. For the more advanced user who doesn't require the higher resolution of the Nikon D3200, it is likely they'll gravitate towards the D5100.

  • Nikon School 2-Day HD-SLR Video Multimedia Workshop, May 5-6

    Ever wonder how to get the most from your HD video enabled digital SLR camera?

    The Nikon School is hosting a full-spectrum 2-day HD DSLR Multimedia Workshop in downtown Boston. Attendees will be provided with loaner cameras, gear, and Apple laptops for editing. The workshop is May 5th and 6th, and will include classroom instruction, real-world shooting, and basic editing. You'll also learn tips for capturing audio. The workshop is limited to 20 students and costs $599. You can register at nikonschool.com/teach.

    Nikon School HD DSLR Multimedia Workshop

  • Nikon D4 Includes Sony XQD 16GB Memory Card and Reader (for now)

    Nikon D4 Includes Sony XQD 16GB Memory Card and Reader

    A lot of customers have heard rumors that the new Nikon D4 is shipping with Sony XQD cards and readers included, and have been asking us if this is true. We can confirm that this is, indeed, true! Some have wondered if these freebies were only included with Nikon Professional Services (NPS) shipments of the Nikon D4. We can also confirm that we have already received both NPS and non-NPS shipments of the new Nikon D4, and they have all included the 16GB XQD cards and card readers. We aren't sure if--or how long--this will continue, but, for now, we'll take it!

  • Olympus OM-D E-M5 Free Accessory Opportunity

    Free Accessory Opportunity with the purchase of an Olympus OM-D E-M5 Digital Camera

    Olympus OM-D E-M5 Front (Silver) with 12-50mm Lens

    Olympus OM-D E-M5 Camera (Silver) with 12-50mm Lens

    The Olympus OM-D E-M5 can be purchased from our website here.

    We are pretty excited to see, and shoot with, the new Olympus OM-D E-M5 micro four-thirds digital camera. As a (in addition to new gearused camera equipment dealer, we've always had a soft spot for Olympus OM 35mm film cameras. There's something about the OM-4 and OM-4T that I particularly love, and I don't think you can really understand until you've had one in your hands. Here's a shot I took a while ago with an Olympus OM-4 and an Olympus OM 50mm f/1.4 lens on Kodak Ektar film. I had it scanned here at our retail store.

    Photograph taken with Olympus OM-4 and 50mm f/1.4 Lens

    Olympus OM-4 with 50mm f/1.4 on Kodak Ektar Film

    Sorry to get sidetracked... We just received word that Olympus will be offering a mail-in rebate for eligible purchases of an Olympus OM-D E-M5 digital camera and select accessories starting April 1 through May 31, 2012. No, unfortunately the Olympus OM-D E-M5 is not yet available, but Olympus tells us the OM-D E-M5 will start shipping in early April, just in time for the free accessory promotion!

    Here's how the promotion works:

    1. Purchase an Olympus OM-D E-M5 (body only or eligible configuration)
    2. Purchase one of these Olympus accessories at the same time:

    • FL-300R Wireless Flash
    • MMF-3 Four Thirds Lens Adapter
    • OM Adapter MF-2

    (only one accessory is eligible per camera purchase)
    3. Submit this mail-in rebate form
    4. Get a rebate for the retail value of the chosen accessory!

    Olympus OM-D E-M5 Free Accessory Opportunity Image

Items 1 to 10 of 32 total

Page:
  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3
  4. 4