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Green Mountain Camera Blog

  • Nikon D5300 vs. D5200: What’s the difference?

    We take a closer look at the differences of the Nikon D5300 and D5200

    Customers are constantly asking us, “what’s the difference”? There are a lot of great products out there, and product features often overlap. Is one brand better than the other? Is one product better than another? The answer is not often an easy, definitive “this one’s better”. There are many aspects and features of a product that will require taking a closer look. In addition, each individual person has different requirements, so not all products are the same to each person.

    The issue gets especially blurred when new products are made. And beyond that, camera makers now have the tendency of keeping older products around for longer. When a new product comes out, the old product is discounted, and kept in the line-up. The tendency used to be to completely discontinue a product, and take it off the shelves, so there was less confusion when making a choice. Newer was better, and that was all you could get. Now, newer may be better, but the older model may be good enough, and the lower price tag is always attractive.

    The new Nikon D5300 and the now older D5200 are perfect examples of this problem at large. We know the D5200 is going to be cheaper, and the D5300 should be better, but “what’s the difference”? It’s not until we take a closer look at the main differences that we can make an informed decision. So let’s take a closer look.

    Image Sensor

    24.2 Megapixels (D5300) vs. 24.1 Megapixels (D5200)

    For a digital camera, the image sensor is a huge part of the equation when making a purchasing decision. Unlike a roll of Kodak Gold 200 film that would be the same from camera to camera, image sensors and the quality of the picture produced by that sensor differ in almost every incarnation of a model line. The easiest difference to spot is megapixel count. In the case of the Nikon D5300 and D5200 they’re essentially the same. Unfortunately, that information alone is not helpful, but let’s take a closer look.

    The D5300 is missing the Optical Low Pass Filter (OLPF) that is typically placed in front of the image sensor. The D5200 still has the OLPF in tact. We first saw Nikon removing the OLPF from the D800E. The Nikon D800 actually has the OLPF, but the D800E does not. This is true with the D5300 and the D5200 too. What is an OLPF, and what is the big deal anyway?

    The OLPF is used to slightly soften an image. You would think that with a high-resolution image sensor you’d want to keep things sharp. To avoid issues with moire, however, camera makers place a filter in front of the image sensor to ever so slightly blur the image. Moire is an effect caused when the pattern in a subject is overlapped with the pattern of an image sensor’s pixels, and you get a strange, additional patterned effect. Well, with high-resolution image sensors, you certainly would like to keep things sharp, so Nikon has started to remove the OLPF. There are really not many situations where moire will be an issue, and with modern software, this issue can often be resolved post-processing. The benefit is ever-so-sharper images.

    If you take pictures of intricate textiles or patterns of colors and shapes, the absence of an OLPF will be a definite downside. For most other situations, the D5300 is going to be a sharper choice.

    OLPF Moire Effect Comparison This image was taken directly from Nikon's website. Here you can see how intricate patterns can create a moire effect when with the absence of an OLPF.

    Processing Engine

    EXPEED 4 (D5300) vs. EXPEED 3 (D5200)

    Along with the image sensor is the image-processing engine. Image processors are small, specialized computers that take all of the information recorded by the camera’s image sensor and turn that into a (hopefully) beautiful picture. Each incarnation of a model line typically has an improved processor. This usually translates into a faster camera, better video, increased low-light (better ISO) performance, etc.. Nikon’s EXPEED 4 is an improvement over the EXPEED 3. One of the biggest benefits includes 1080 60p HD video. The D5200 has 1080 60i HD vdieo.

    Video

    1080 60p HD (D5300) vs. 1080 60i HD (D5200)

    Although the Nikon D5200 is capable of shooting progressive 1080 HD video at lower frame rates, the D5300 expands the video shooting capability of the product line by featuring progressive HD video at 60 frames per second. The D5200 is capable of 60 frames per second too, but the video is interlaced.

    Interlaced video is essentially video with half the resolution, but shown twice to get full resolution. One frame of video is essentially split in two. One frame will feature even lines of a picture, while another frame will feature odds. When the frames are flashed quickly on a screen, one after the other, the human eye perceives the image as having full resolution, not separate frames of alternating lines of resolution. This usually works out fine, until there’s action. When watching fast moving objects you can observe “artifacts” with interlaced video. It will look like the moving object is slightly blurred at the edges and has horizontal lines through it. Progressive video displays every line with each frame, so there is no potential for artifacting. The overall quality will look much better, especially when viewed on bigger TVs or screens.

    Interlaced Video Example of Fast Moving Object This photo is courtesy of Wikipedia. It shows the artifacts of interlaced video, especially for moving objects.

    Wi-Fi

    Built-in (D5300) vs. WU-1a Adapter (D5200)

    The Nikon D5300 and D5200 are both capable of connecting to Wi-Fi, but the D5300 has it built-in. The D5200 requires an adapter, the Nikon WU-1a, which is an additional $60 purchase.

    Wi-Fi in these cameras is really cool, and for at least two reasons. The first is for being able to share images quickly and easily. The smartphone camera has become wildly popular for several reasons, but a big part of it is being able to easily and instantly share images on social networks. The only problem with smartphone cameras is that the quality of the images is still lacking overall. The Wi-Fi capability of the D5300 and D5200 with the optional WU-1a, allows you to connect to your smartphone to share your images instantly like you would with pictures taken by your smartphone. This is a win-win. Instant sharing, plus exceptional image quality.

    Another benefit of Wi-Fi is being able to control these cameras remotely. Although this benefit is used less often, it is pretty cool that you can control the cameras from your smartphone. I know of a customer who set their camera on a tripod near a hummingbird feeder and went around the corner of his house. He was able to capture some amazing pictures of the birds by snapping away from his smartphone, and didn’t have to worry about scaring the birds away.

    In addition to Wi-Fi being built in, the D5300 also features built-in GPS. Again, the D5200 is capable of GPS, but requires a Nikon GP-1A adapter, which is an optional accessory that costs over $200. GPS can be really cool. Each image capture can record and save the GPS coordinates of the location where the image was taken. You’ll never forget where you took a picture again. Using Google Maps or Nikon’s software you can view on a map the locations of each of your recorded shots.

    Build/Construction

    Monocoque design (D5300) vs. More traditional structure (D5200)

    The Nikon D5300 is even smaller and lighter than the already light and compact D5200. This is due to the monocoque design of the D5300. What exactly does this mean? Think of a monocoque structure as like an exoskeleton. Instead of the insides supporting the structure of the outside, the outsides help to give the overall structure support and durability. The D5300 uses some specialized materials and design in its outer coverings to reduce joints and increase the support and durability of the camera, all the while reducing its overall weight and size. The D5200 weighs approximately 555g to the D5300 at 530g.

    Final Thoughts

    Overall there’s no doubt that the D5300 is an improvement over the D5200. In addition to the differences noted above, the D5300 has a bigger, higher resolution LCD screen. It is 3.2” and a 1037k dot resolution screen over the D5200’s 3” and 921k dot resolution screen. The D5300 also added a couple more picture (art) modes, which include Toy Camera Effect and HDR Painting.

    The biggest features to stand out are the removal of the OLPF and the built-in Wi-Fi. Right now there isn’t really a big difference in price. Actually, the starting prices are the same. The D5200 has been on sale for $100 off, however, and we assume this will only increase. Are these features worth $100 or more? It depends on what you are using the camera for and how these features meet your needs. If you are going to use it, the built-in Wi-Fi saves you $60 for that feature, and the GPS will save you more. If you want the best resolution possible, and are not afraid of some moire at times, the D5300 will be tack sharp. Whatever you decide, both cameras will overall take great pictures.

  • Hands-On Video Unboxing of the Olympus OM-D E-M1

    The new Olympus OM-D E-M1 has been trickling into our stores, and it has been causing a lot of excitement. This camera has been in short supply since its release, and we wanted to share the experience of what it is like to actually have one and open it up.

    Every time I put my hands on this camera I am instantly reminded of my old Olympus OM-4. The OM-D E-M1 does feel better in my hands, however; the grip is really nice. This is a really cool camera, and the retro look and feel just adds to the overall experience without taking away from the camera.

    The OM-D E-M1 can be purchased in our stores or online here. As noted, this camera has been trickling in and the demand is high. If you are interested in purchasing one, and it doesn't look like we have it in stock, please give us a call (802) 244-0883 and we would be happy to add you to our list. You can also contact us through our website here.

  • Nikon Df Digital SLR Camera and Limited Edition 50mm f/1.8 Lens Announced

    Nikon Df Digital SLR Camera If you have been paying attention to the Nikon USA website, you've probably noticed the series of videos they have been posting on the homepage. Over several days, and through a series of well-produced teaser videos, Nikon has been strategically revealing what we can now say is the Nikon Df. Nikon's revelation campaign centered around getting back to "Pure Photography", and made it clear that the Df would be a throw-back to a previous chapter of Nikon's history.

    We feel this has been one of Nikon's best marketing efforts for a camera announcement. Product announcements are typically thrown at the public. One day the product is a secret, the next day the whole world knows. The campaign to reveal the Nikon Df created a lot of buzz, and got a lot of people excited...including us.

    If you weren't already aware, used camera equipment is a big part of our business. I don't think there is a time when we don't have a Nikon FM, FM2, or similar type of mechanical 35mm film camera around. We see them all the time, and that is a testament to how popular the older, mechanical Nikon film cameras were. The new Nikon Df digital SLR is a throw-back to that time, and highlights a lot of the manual features that were standard on those analog cameras.

    Nikon Df Manual Features

     

    As you can see, the control dials of the Nikon Df are built for manual control. It's strange to see a mechanical ISO setting dial on a digital camera. The information display on the top has shrunk. Here the display features shutter speed, aperture value, battery charge, and shots left on the memory card. And that's it. This downsized display has made room for a quite large shutter value dial, and also the mode selector dial (manual, aperture value priority, shutter value priority and program mode). For digital cameras these things are typically manipulated by the press of a button.

    Nikon is using the same 16.2 megapixel (MP) full-frame (FX format in Nikon's terminology) image sensor, paired with the Nikon EXPEED 3 image processor, as seen in their flagship Nikon D4. Nikon boasts that the Df is their thinnest and lightest full-frame digital SLR to date. The Nikon Df also features a huge ISO range that is expandable up to 204,800. I'm sure a lot of users will be happy to get some of the performance aspects (image quality) of the D4 for half the price.

    We're really excited that Nikon has developed a lens mount system for this camera that will allow it to work with all modern AF-S, AF-D and AF NIKKOR lenses, in addition to AI and non-AI lenses alike. Owners of old NIKKOR glass will really appreciate that inclusion.

    The camera also features a continuous shooting speed of 5.5 frames per second, and Wi-Fi with the optional Nikon Wu-1a adapter. Of all the features that this camera does include, the Nikon Df does not have video. The Df has no option for capturing video. I guess Nikon's idea of "pure photography" is still capture only.

    The Nikon Df should be available by the end of this month (November, 2013) in both silver and black, and will cost $2749.95 for the body only. Nikon has produced a limited edition AF-S NIKKOR 50mm f/1.8G lens with retro styling to match the new Nikon Df. The camera will be sold as a kit with this lens for $2999.95. We'll have the new Nikon Df online and in our stores for demonstration and sale as soon as they come in, and we are currently taking pre-orders. Just give us a call at (802) 244-0883 if you are interested.

    Nikon Df in Black

     

    Nikon Df Back in Black

  • Green Mountain Camera Joins Fujifilm Authorized Elite Digital Dealers

    Waterbury Center, Vt., NOV. 2, 2013: Green Mountain Camera is the latest retailer to join the Fujifilm program of Authorized Elite Digital Dealers. Green Mountain Camera enters the program as the first photo specialty retailer based in Vermont.

    The Fujifilm Authorized Elite Digital Dealer program is a limited dealership opportunity where authorized dealers demonstrate and sell the X-Series lineup of Fujifilm digital imaging products. The X-Series profile of digital imaging products includes some of the world’s most popular digital cameras like the X100s and X-PRO1.

    Fujifilm X100s

    “Green Mountain Camera is extremely honored to be part of Fujifilm’s Elite Dealer program,” stated John Ste. Marie, Owner of Green Mountain Camera. “We are excited to bring the X-Series lineup of digital imaging products to our customer base, here in Vermont and throughout the United States.”

    Green Mountain Camera will start receiving X-Series digital imaging products from Fujifilm over the next several weeks, including the most recently announced XQ1 and X-E2. This is in addition to other X-series products like the X-M1, X100s, X-PRO1 and Fujifilm’s X-mount series of lenses.

    “This is exactly the type of product our customers want to see,” stated Tessa K. Ferrario, Operations Manager of Green Mountain Camera. “High-end digital imaging products like the X-series line are not always common in local retail stores, but customers want to see what these products have to offer. Looking online is not the same as having something in your hands.”

    Green Mountain Camera will have Fujifilm X-series digital imaging products on display for demonstration in retail stores in South Burlington, Vt., and Waterbury Center, Vt.. These products will also be available online through Green Mountain Camera’s website.

  • Nikon 58mm f/1.4G AF-S NIKKOR Lens Added to Nikon Lineup

    Nikon 58mm f/1.4G AF-S NIKKOR Lens

    A fast normal lens for which advanced optical design technologies have been adopted for both superior rendering of point light sources and beautiful bokeh with smooth focusing transition from blurred to sharp

    TOKYO - Nikon is pleased to announce the release of the AF-S NIKKOR 58mm f/1.4G, a fast normal lens compatible with Nikon FX-format digital SLR cameras.

    The Nikon 58mm f/1.4G is a lens that makes the most of advanced optical design technologies long cultivated by Nikon to achieve high reproduction capability of point light sources even at the maximum aperture, and natural depth of subjects utilizing smooth and beautiful bokeh characteristics. With shooting of distant night landscapes, the lens minimizes the sagittal coma flare that makes a point light source look like a bird with its wings spread to render point light sources as sharp points with no distortion or fringes across the entire frame, even at maximum aperture, for clear and crisp night landscape shots.
    In addition, the Nikon 58mm f/1.4G renders subjects impressively with beautiful bokeh that moderately changes as the distance from the sharply focused point increases for natural depth that makes near human subjects or still objects appear more three dimensional.

    What's more, despite being a fast lens, not only is light falloff controlled for natural brightness across the entire frame, even at the maximum aperture of f/1.4, for sharp rendering of objects at infinity, but adoption of Nano Crystal Coat effectively reduces flare and ghost.

    This single lens responds to the demands of professional and advanced amateur photographers looking to achieve the images they intend with all types of photos, from night landscapes to impressive photos utilizing bokeh.

    Nikon AF-S NIKKOR 58mm f/1.4G Primary Features

    -A fast normal lens with a focal length of 58mm and maximum aperture of f/1.4 that utilizes advanced optical design technologies
    -Minimization of sagittal coma flare for high reproduction capability of point light sources as sharp points across the entire frame
    -Sharp, high-resolution images can be reproduced even at the maximum aperture
    -Original lens characteristics that provide natural depth reproduction with which the degree of bokeh moderately changes as the distance from the sharply focused point increases
    -Controlled light falloff retains natural brightness across the entire frame even at the maximum aperture of f/1.4
    -Nano Crystal Coat effectively reduces flare and ghost

    Development background

    The Nikon 58mm f/1.4G was developed as a lens that offers new photographic creativity possible only with NIKKOR lenses.

    Point light source reproduction capability with superior resolution and no distortion or fringes was improved with further development of the concept behind the Ai Noct Nikkor 58mm f/1.2 (released in 1977), which enabled rendering of point light sources as sharp points, as well as adoption of advanced optical design technologies based on 80 years of Nikon know-how and optical technologies. Further, Nikon also adopted a design concept based on the reproduction of three-dimensional subjects as natural images with depth in two-dimensional photography for a "three-dimensionally high-fidelity lens". As a result, the lens also offers beautiful bokeh capabilities.

    This exclusive reproduction capability expands the ways in which users express themselves for positioning that distinguishes this lens from other lenses.

     

  • Olympus Stylus 1 - Big Zoom, Fast Aperture Lens Camera Announced

    Olympus Stylus 1 Front View

    Olympus STYLUS 1® UNIFIES DSLR PERFORMANCE, LENS POWER AND MAXIMUM PORTABILITY IN ONE COMPACT PACKAGE

    The First Olympus Fusion of Ultimate Image Quality, High-Powered i.ZUIKO® DIGITAL Lens, and Built-In EVF

    CENTER VALLEY, PA., October 29, 2013 – Olympus has redefined the enthusiast compact camera by uniting many of the best features found across its camera lineup in the new STYLUS. Designed for semi-pro shooters who demand optical brilliance, DSLR operation, convenience and portability, this one-size-fits-all package has head-turning, OM-inspired looks as well as premium imaging performance.

    The STYLUS 1 includes an i.ZUIKO lens that incorporates the outstanding optical quality of the Olympus ZUIKO interchangeable lenses. At its heart is a large 1/1.7-inch BSI CMOS sensor and TruePic VI image processor along with additional features, including the built-in electronic viewfinder (EVF) from the award-winning Olympus OM-D E-M5® and Wi-Fi for shooting and sharing anywhere. Whether you want the latest and greatest high-tech tool, or if you simply prefer something that is lightweight and easy to take when you are on the go, there is truly something for everyone.

    One Great Lens

    The newly developed, ultra-slim 10.7x (28–300mm*) high-power i.ZUIKO lens features constant f2.8 brightness across the zoom range and is versatile enough to capture wide to telephoto shots and produce pro-quality stills with beautiful, defocused backgrounds and crisp images even when telephoto shooting in low light. The large diameter lens incorporates a powerful, built-in VCM image stabilization mechanism that virtually eliminates camera shake and blur. Its lens can also capture stunning macro shots from 2 inches away. When the lens is not in use, it retracts fully into the camera body (behind a removable automatic lens cap), so the STYLUS 1 fits easily into a coat pocket.

    One Great Sensor

    Olympus designed the new lens to work seamlessly with its 12.0 megapixel 1/1.7-inch high-sensitivity backlit CMOS sensor and TruePicVI image processor, the same processor used in the Olympus OM-D

    E-M5, for fast recovery time and shutter speed to capture images with rich details and low noise. Images come through with true-to-life flesh tones, brilliant blue skies and precise tonal expression. The STYLUS 1 also inherits FAST TOUCH AF system from the Olympus PEN® series for near-instant, precision focusing via the tilt-able LCD touchscreen monitor.

    One Great Electronic Viewfinder

    The STYLUS 1 is the first Olympus enthusiast, premium compact camera equipped with a built-in electronic viewfinder (EVF). The 1.44 million dot resolution LCD EVF has a 1.15x viewfinder magnification rate (equivalent to 0.58x of 35mm film camera) and 100 percent field of view — just like a DSLR — so users can easily compose their subjects directly with clear visibility from the center to the edges. The eye sensor automatically switches the live view display from the high-resolution 3.0-inch, 1.04 million dot resolution tilt-able LCD touchscreen monitor to the EVF in no time as the camera approaches the user’s eye. A variety of information is displayed in an easy-to-view layout on the EVF screen, including variables such as exposure and color.

    Operability for all Shooting Styles

    The STYLUS 1 incorporates an ideal blend of effective, hands-on controls, including a hybrid control ring similar to the one found on the Olympus STYLUS XZ-2 iHS. The control ring is built around the lens and can be switched between digital and analog operation with the control lever located on the front of the camera. In digital mode, the ring turns smoothly for fine zooming or manual focusing, and in analog mode, users can adjust settings such as aperture, shutter speed and more. The front grip ensures a precise hold, while the sub-dial, positioned near the shutter button, provides further operational accuracy. The camera is also equipped with a hot shoe for accessories, built-in flash, a side zoom lever with variable speeds and two customizable function buttons for easy access to commonly used settings.

    Wi-Fi Sharing and Control

    Built-in Wi-Fi is easy to set up. By quickly scanning the QR code displayed on the camera's LCD with a smart device, it syncs with the Wi-Fi network created by the camera. The free Olympus Image Share 2.1 Smartphone app synchronizes a user’s Smartphone and the STYLUS 1 so the camera’s “Live View” is effectively displayed on the phone, and the camera can be controlled by touching the Smartphone display*. Users can wirelessly adjust various settings, such as the shutter speed, aperture value, ISO and exposure compensation, as well as operate the Live Bulb shooting mode from their Wi-Fi devices. They can also use their Smartphone to embed GPS information into their images.

    Creative Possibilities

    In addition to superior still image quality, the 1080p Full HD Movie capability with stereo sound and high-speed movie recording (120fps/240fps) captures movies for dramatic slow-motion playback of fast-action scenes. The STYLUS 1’s 11 included Art Filters™ with bracketing option, five Art Effects and Photo Story, which shoots a group of still photos straight into attractive, prepared layouts, effortlessly bring the user’s artistic visions to life. Users can also capture RAW image data for post-processing flexibility, create motion blur effects without overexposing thanks to a built-in ND filter (with 3 EV stops) and capture up to 7 frames per second in full resolution!

    Several new accessories are designed to complement the STYLUS 1 and broaden the creative potential of this powerhouse compact camera. The EP-11 eyecup cuts out peripheral light for improved visibility in bright conditions; a full-body jacket protects the camera against damage and comes with a tailored cover, and the CLA-13 converter adapter for the high-grade TCON-17x 1.7x teleconverter lens that extends the focal length of the camera to 510mm and retains the outstanding brightness of a constant 1:2.8 aperture.

    *35mm equivalent.

    U.S. Pricing and Availability
    The Olympus STYLUS 1 will be available in December 2013.
    $699.99 Available in Black

    Olympus Stylus 1 Front Lens Open Olympus Stylus 1 Front Lens Closed Olympus Stylus 1 Back

  • Sigma offers Mount Conversion Service for recent lenses


    Sigma 18-35mm f/1.8 Art Lens

     

    Manufacturer announces first-ever mount change option, as well as universal, four-year warranty for all products

    RONKONKOMA, N.Y., — Aug. 1, 2013— Sigma Corporation of America, a leading researcher, developer, manufacturer and service provider of some of the world’s most impressive lines of lenses, cameras and flashes, today announced a revolutionary new, fee-based service that will enable the company’s Global Vision lens owners to change their lens mounts for use on different camera systems.

    Starting Sept. 2, Global Vision lens owners can request the Mount Conversion Service to convert their current Sport, Contemporary or Art DSLR lenses to their choice of a Sigma, Sony, Pentax, Nikon or Canon mount. Global Vision category lenses for mirrorless interchangeable lens cameras (MILCs) can be updated to either a micro four thirds (MFT) or Sony E- mount.

    In addition to the announcement of the industry’s first Mount Conversion Service, Sigma is also extending the warranty on all of its products – including cameras, lenses and flashes purchased on or after July 1, 2013 – to four years. Previously, warranties varied by product. This enhanced product protection provides Sigma’s customers with more consistency and improved service.

    “Professionals and amateurs alike are taking advantage of the many affordable camera options in today’s market; they’re updating their camera bags and exploring new systems and brands,” said Mark Amir-Hamzeh, president of Sigma Corporation of America. “When photographers purchase a lens, it’s often a significant, financial and artistic commitment – and we believe that investment should last a lifetime. Our new Mount Conversion Service and extended warranty are intended to help Sigma users get more enjoyment from our products, regardless of how their approach to photography changes overtime.”

    The Mount Conversion Service is limited to all of Sigma’s Global Vision lenses. Current, applicable full-frame lenses include the 120-300mm F2.8 DG OS Sport and 35mm F1.4 DG Art; APS-C crop sensor lenses include the 30mm F1.4 DC HSM Art, 17-70mm F2.8-4 DC OS Macro Contemporary and 18-35mm F1.8 DC Art; and MILC lenses include the 19mm F2.8 DN Art, 30mm F2.8 DN Art and 60mm F2.8 DN Art. Lenses can be converted to any mount of a photographer’s choosing, as long as Sigma has released that product in the requested mount.

    Cost of the conversion will range between $80 to $250, plus shipping costs, depending on the focal length of the lens. All lenses will be shipped to Sigma’s US subsidiary in New York, and updated, calibrated and optimized for the new camera system at Sigma’s factory in Aizu, Japan. Teleconverters, USB Docks and other accessories are not eligible for the service.

    To request the Mount Conversion Service, customers in the United States should visit www.sigmaphoto.com.

    About Sigma Corporation

    For 50 years, Sigma Corporation’s expertise and innovation has driven the company’s core philosophy of “knowledge, plus experience, plus imagination,” with an emphasis on producing high-quality, high-performance photographic technology at moderate prices. This family-owned organization is the largest, independent SLR lens manufacturer in the world, producing more than 50 lenses that are compatible with most manufacturers, including Sigma, Canon, Sony, Nikon, Olympus and Pentax. Sigma Corporation also produces digital SLR cameras and high-definition digital compact cameras. The company is headquartered in Japan, with offices strategically located throughout Europe, Asia and North America. For information, please visit www.sigmaphoto.com.

     

  • Canon Develops New Dual Pixel CMOS AF Technology

    Canon EOS 70D Digital SLR Camera

    Canon Develops New Dual Pixel CMOS AF Technology To Significantly Improve Autofocus Performance During Live View And Video Shooting

     

    MELVILLE, N.Y., July 2, 2013 – Canon U.S.A., Inc., a leader in digital imaging solutions, today announced its parent company, Canon Inc., developed Dual Pixel CMOS AF, an innovative new autofocus technology for the EOS 70D Digital SLR camera. Dual Pixel CMOS AF, a phase-detection AF technology conducted directly on the image sensor plane, employs a CMOS sensor on which all of the effective pixels are able to perform both imaging and phase-detection AF simultaneously to achieve dramatically improved AF performance over prior EOS cameras during Live View and video shooting.

     

     

    Dual Pixel CMOS AF
    Dual Pixel CMOS AF logo
    Dual Pixel CMOS AF structure

    As digital SLR cameras have evolved in recent years in terms of functionality and performance, shooting styles have become more diverse. An increasing number of users no longer rely exclusively on the viewfinder when shooting, but rather view the camera's LCD monitor when using the Live View function to capture still images and when shooting video.

    Canon's newly-developed Dual Pixel CMOS AF is an innovative new image-plane phase-detection AF technology that employs a CMOS sensor on which all of the effective pixels are able to perform both imaging and phase-detection AF simultaneously. Each individual pixel (the smallest structural unit capable of outputting an image signal) on the CMOS sensor incorporates two independent photodiodes (elements that transform light into electrical signals) which output signals that can be used for both imaging and the phase-detection AF. When using the EOS 70D Digital SLR camera's Live View function, the technology enables autofocusing with ease, flexibility, speed and accuracy similar to shooting through the viewfinder, enabling sharp focus to be obtained across a wide shooting area1 through phase-detection AF2 until final focus is achieved. Compared with earlier generations of Canon's image-plane phase-detection AF3, Dual Pixel CMOS AF realizes shorter focusing times, outstanding tracking performance and smoother autofocusing during video shooting. And, because Live View shooting can be used in a manner similar to using the camera's viewfinder, the fast and smooth AF performance allows users to concentrate more attention on the subject and composing the photo when shooting.

    Compared with the EOS Rebel SL1, which employs Hybrid CMOS AF II, the EOS 70D Digital SLR camera (scheduled to go on sale in September 2013), which is the first camera to feature Dual Pixel CMOS AF, not only achieves AF speed that is approximately 30 percent faster4 but also delivers improved Movie Servo AF tracking for continuously smooth focusing during video shooting, even when filming quickly moving subjects.

    Because the outstanding AF performance of Dual Pixel CMOS AF is made possible with 1035models of EF lenses (including many earlier models and models available outside of Japan), users can enjoy a wide range of photographic endeavors achievable with various lenses.

    Recognizing great potential for the application of this technology across diverse product categories, Canon aims to promote its development efforts in the field of AF technology, targeting further advances to contribute to expanding the world of photographic expression.

    How Dual Pixel CMOS AF Works

     

    How Dual Pixel CMOS AF Works.

    Reference information

    Phase-detection AF
    With conventional phase-detection AF, the light that enters through the photographic lens is divided into two images. The difference in the focus point position between the two images is measured on a dedicated AF sensor rather than the image sensor itself, enabling the camera to determine the direction and amount of lens adjustment required to obtain proper focus. Because phase-detection AF enables fast focusing performance compared with contrast-detection AF, the technology is widely employed in digital SLR cameras, mainly for viewfinder shooting.

    Dual Pixel CMOS AF employs the same measurement principle as a dedicated AF sensor, except that it is carried out directly with the image sensor. Its large coverage area enables smooth and reliable image-plane phase-detection AF for both still images and video with no reliance on dedicated AF sensors or contrast-detection AF.

    Contrast AF
    Contrast AF is an autofocus method employed in compact digital cameras and video camcorders, as well as conventional digital SLR cameras for Live View shooting. Because contrast is highest when an image is in proper focus, the camera analyzes the contrast information from the image on the image sensor, adjusting the lens until the maximum contrast value is reached. While contrast AF offers high focusing accuracy, it tends to require more time compared with phase-detection AF because the focusing components of the lens must be driven during AF measurement to find the point of peak contrast.

    Hybrid CMOS AF and Hybrid CMOS AF II
    Hybrid CMOS AF is an AF method employed in the EOS Rebel T5i Digital SLR camera and the EOS M digital camera that delivers enhanced focusing speed during Live View shooting and when shooting video. Combining fast phase-detection AF and high-accuracy contrast AF, Hybrid CMOS AF makes possible faster focusing performance than contrast AF alone, quickly measuring the subject distance using a dedicated phase-detection AF image element embedded in the CMOS image sensor and completing the process with extreme accuracy using contrast AF. The EOS Rebel SL1 camera features Hybrid CMOS AF II, which makes use of an imaging sensor that supports AF across a wide area spanning approximately 80 percent of the shooting area measured vertically and horizontally.

    For more information about the development of Dual Pixel CMOS AF visit:http://usa.canon.com/gamechangeraf

  • New! Canon EOS 70D Digital SLR Camera with Dual Pixel CMOS Autofocus

    Canon EOS 70D Digital SLR Camera

    Canon EOS 70D  is Designed to Change the Way Photographers Capture Images and Video, New Camera Features Newly-Developed Dual Pixel CMOS AF Technology, Built-in Wireless Capability, 20.2 Megapixel CMOS Sensor, DIGIC 5+ Image Processor, and More

     

    MELVILLE, N.Y., July 2, 2013 – Canon U.S.A., Inc., a leader in digital imaging solutions, is proud to introduce the high-performance Canon EOS 70D Digital SLR camera - bringing advanced features to photo enthusiasts looking for a step up from their entry-level digital SLRs. Featuring an innovative new Dual Pixel CMOS AF system for instant and precise focusing of video as well as still images, the Canon EOS 70D also provides outstanding image quality and performance thanks to its new 20.2 megapixel APS-C Canon CMOS sensor and Canon's superb DIGIC 5+ Image Processor.

    Canon's newly-developed Dual Pixel CMOS AF, a phase-detection autofocus (AF) technology on the camera's image sensor plane, enables users to shoot video with the new EOS 70D close to the quality of a video shot with a camcorder. Dual Pixel CMOS AF employs a revolutionary CMOS sensor on which all of the effective pixels are able to perform both still imaging and phase-detection AF simultaneously to achieve dramatically improved AF performance over other EOS cameras during Live View shooting and when shooting video.

    Compared with Canon's conventional Live View AF systems, Dual Pixel CMOS AF realizes shorter focusing times, exceptional tracking performance and smoother autofocusing during video shooting. And, because Live View shooting can be used in a manner similar to using the camera's viewfinder, the fast and smooth AF performance allows users to concentrate more attention on the subject and composing the photo when shooting. Dual Pixel CMOS AF also supports 1031 models of EF lenses (including many earlier models), enhancing a photographer's creative options as well as maximizing the benefit of Dual Pixel CMOS AF in a variety of situations.

    "The new Canon EOS 70D Digital SLR camera is a game-changing DSLR model that incorporates advanced features for high-quality still and video capture and intuitive operation that allows photographers to evolve their creative vision from shooting still images to shooting moving images," said Yuichi Ishizuka, executive vice president and general manager, Imaging Technologies & Communications Group, Canon U.S.A. "This camera's outstanding image quality combined with built-in wireless technology and popular creative functions and filters makes it easy to turn photos into works of art and share them immediately."

    Wireless Connectivity
    The Canon EOS 70D Digital SLR camera's built-in wireless transmitter offers users several connectivity options to easily share their images. With the download of the free EOS Remote app from the Apple App Store or the Google Play store, users can connect to both iOS® or Android™smartphones and tablets to wirelessly transfer photos and videos from their camera to their device. They can also control aperture, shutter speed, and ISO from their smartphone. This camera also has the ability to connect directly to Canon's iMAGE GATEWAY, making photos easily accessible and ready to share on social networking sites. In addition, the Canon EOS 70D has the ability to connect wirelessly to computers, DLNA devices, Wi-Fi Certified® Canon cameras and wireless PictBridge compatible printers, such as the PIXMA MG6320 Wireless Photo All-In-One printer model.

    Superb Still Performance
    Featuring a new 20.2 megapixel APS-C Canon CMOS sensor and Canon's superb DIGIC 5+ Image Processor, as well as an extensive ISO range of 100-12800 (expandable to 25,600), the Canon EOS 70D Digital SLR camera is capable of producing sharp, detailed images, even in low-light conditions. And with high-speed continuous shooting of up to 7.0 frames per second (fps) united with a 19-point all cross-type AF system (including a high-precision f/2.8 dual cross-type AF center point), it allows photographers to easily capture accurately focused fast moving subjects. In addition, the camera's Scene Intelligent Auto Mode delivers optimized photos and offers outstanding scene detection for amazing results even when shooting in low light.

    The Canon EOS 70D also incorporates a 63-zone Dual Layer IFCL (Intelligent Focus, Color & Luminance) AE metering system which enhances accurate exposures by minimizing random metering errors caused by varying subject colors and light sources. Other useful features include a built-in Electronic Level Function, Manual WB settings and AF Microadjustment.

    Enhanced EOS Full HD Movie Mode for Professional Quality Video
    With Canon's new Dual Pixel CMOS AF system and Movie Servo AF, the camera provides continuous phase-detection AF during video recording for quick and accurate focus tracking of moving subjects in the central 80 percent of the imaging area. While shooting with any of Canon's Stepping Motor (STM) lenses, such as the new EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM lens, motor noise from the lens is significantly reduced so the camera will only capture the stereo sound of the scene being recorded. For added flexibility, the Canon EOS 70D Digital SLR camera also features a built-in stereo microphone with manual audio level adjustment and an attenuator function to reduce audio clipping, an accessory jack for external stereo microphones and Video Snapshot mode with editing for expanded video shooting options. When users select the EOS Movie Mode, the Canon EOS 70D offers the ability to shoot in 1080p Full HD video up to 30 fps in either ALL-I or IPB codecs with optional embedded time code, matching the flexibility of other current EOS cameras such as the EOS-1D X, EOS 5D Mark III, and EOS 6D models.

    Expanding Creativity
    The Canon EOS 70D Digital SLR camera provides advanced amateur photographers and photo hobbyists looking to hone their creative and technical skills with an innovative range of in-camera imaging features such as High Dynamic Range, Multiple Exposure, Handheld Night Scene and HDR Backlight Control modes that allow for expanded creativity. The new camera is also equipped with built-in RAW Image Processing and Image Resizing functions.

    When any one of the seven Creative Filters is applied in Live View, users can preview the effect of the filter on the three-inch Vari-Angle Touch Screen monitor without having to shoot the image first. Users can pick from effects such as Art Bold, Fish-eye, Water-painting, Grainy Black and White, Soft Focus, Toy Camera and Miniature and choose the one that best expresses their creative vision before or after the image is captured.

    All of these features, when combined with a high-resolution Vari-angle Touch Screen 3.0-inch Clear View LCD monitor II with intuitive touch controls featuring multi-touch operation and Touch AF, make it the ideal camera choice for photographers looking for the best in imaging technology.

    The Canon EOS 70D is compatible with the full line of Canon EF and EF-S lenses as well as SD/SDHC/SDXC memory cards, including Ultra High Speed (UHS-1) cards.

    Availability
    The Canon EOS 70D Digital SLR camera is scheduled to be available in September 2013 for an estimated retail price of $1199.00 for the body alone and $1349.00 bundled with an EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM lens or $1549.00 bundled with the EF-S 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM lens. Also available will be a new Battery Grip BG-E14 that conveniently accepts up to two LP-E6 battery packs or a set of six AA batteries for an estimated retail price of $270.00.

    Canon EOS 70D Digital SLR Camera Canon EOS 70D Digital SLR Camera Canon EOS 70D Digital SLR Camera

  • Father's Day Sale on Nikon and Canon Digital Cameras

    Father's Day Sale

    Father's are really important. Fathers raise us, support us, and shape us. Let's face it, we wouldn't be here if it wasn't for dad. It is important to recognize our fathers, and let them know that we care.

    I am really lucky to see my dad almost every day, but I know I don't tell him enough just how much I appreciate him being my dad. Luckily, there is a special holiday that comes around every year in June--Father's Day. Father's Day this year is in one week, June 16th, and is a great time to get Dad something he's always wanted, or to give him a special keep-sake or memory.

    If you're looking for something special to get your dad, we are here to help. For the next week, we are running some great specials on digital cameras, lenses, and accessories. We also have our photo lab staff at the ready to make beautiful photo prints of your favorite memories with dad. We have a large selection of frames, albums and mats to make your precious memories that much more special.

    This morning we highlighted sales from Nikon and Canon for Father's Day with a couple of newspaper inserts. If you missed those inserts, here are the Canon Father's Day sales and Nikon Father's Day sales in PDF.

    Don't forget! We now have two store locations to better server Vermonters. One in Waterbury Center, and the other in South Burlington.

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