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  • Sony A7 Real-World Samples and RAW File Download

    We were recently at the PhotoPlus Expo in New York City. There wasn't a whole lot of camera gear there we haven't already seen, but there were a couple of cameras worth noting. Besides the Olympus OM-D E-M1, we were excited to check out the Sony A7 and A7r. The display area for both cameras was packed, and it was hard to get a chance for a hands-on look. We had our sights set on checking out the new Zeiss 55mm f/1.8 lens too. We weren't able to grab an A7r, but we were able to look at the Sony A7 with the 55mm lens.

    The Sony A7 is a world's first. It is the first mirrorless interchangeable lens camera to feature a full-frame image sensor. The A7 packs 24 megapixels, while the A7r boasts an impressive 36 megapixels. We currently have both cameras on order, and are hoping they will show up in early December. We anticipate this will be a limited early release, and the demand will be pretty high, so we won't have cameras in stock for very long. If you are interested in a pre-order to secure a camera for you, please give us a call at (802) 244-0883.

    The A7 has a solid feel to it, and there are lot of external controls for manual manipulation. The camera is overall snappy and intuitive for the average advanced camera user. Sony must have heard of the complaints coming from NEX-7 users who were accidentally hitting the video record button. Sony moved this button to a better, safer position on the A7.

    While at the PhotoPlus Expo we switched out the memory card in the A7 we were using for our own memory card. We were able to pop off a couple of shots within the convention center. The lighting wasn't great, and the images weren't thought through, but here are some real world samples straight from the camera. The camera was set to aperture priority, ISO 400, and the aperture was set to f/1.8. The image of the older gentlemen looking down was shot at 1/60 of a second, so there is definitely some shake. The others were 1/125 of a second and are more solid.

    Sony A7 Sample Image Sony A7 Sample Cropped Sony A7 Sample Image Sony A7 Sample Cropped Sony A7 Sample Image Sony A7 Sample Cropped

     

    These images are sized down to play nice on the website. They were actually all shot in RAW, so they've been converted. If you are interested in looking at a RAW file, you can download one here. It is a relatively big file, 25MB. You will need high-speed internet, or it might take you while to download. Please note that there is no 3rd-party software out there that will allow you to view the A7 RAW file, like Photoshop, etc.. You will need Sony's Image Data Converter. The Mac version can be found here, and the Windows here.

  • Sony Introduces New Cyber-shot RX100 Advanced Compact Digital Camera

    The RX100 is the world’s first compact camera with a 1.0 inch type Exmor® CMOS Sensor featuring a resolution of 20.2 effective megapixels

    Sony Cyver-Shot DSC-RX100 Digital Camera

    The high-end compact digital camera market has become extremely popular, and Sony looks to add to this market with the new Cyber-shot RX100.

    In talking about high-end compacts, you have to think about Canon. The Canon Powershot G series has always been a popular line, but many customers complain of the size. Although relatively compact to a digital SLR, the Canon Powershot G series has always been on the bulky side. Bulky enough to keep G cameras out of pants pockets. Helping to alleviate that glut, Canon introduced the Powershot S90, and a high-end "pocketable" craze was born/reborn. In addition to the small size, a huge draw was to the high-quality, fast aperture f/2 lens the S90 offered. Since then we have seen the Olympus XZ-1, Canon S95 and S100, the Nikon P300 and P310, among others. These cameras lack something, however; and that's a larger sized image sensor.

    A trend we have been seeing for a while now is trying to get a larger sensor in a more compact body. m4/3 (micro four-thirds) cameras, Sony NEX, and Nikon 1 cameras do a pretty good job of this, especially when taking into consideration the ability of these cameras to interchange lenses. Still, these cameras are nowhere near "pocketable", and not everyone wants them to be.

    Canon hit the industry with a fixed lens camera, the G1 x, that has a larger image sensor and is more compact, but still, like the other G series cameras, is not going to fit in any pants (unless they're cargoes).

    Today, Sony announces the introduction of a new camera that is a first of its kind, so far. The Cyber-shot RX100 features a larger 1" image sensor, and it will fit in your pants pocket. It is also a very high-resolution camera for a compact, and features 20.2 effective megapixels. In addition, the RX100 features a fast f/1.8 aperture Carl Zeiss lens with Zeiss T* coatings. If the quality of this lens lives up to the Zeiss name, that in itself will make the camera worth the $650 price tag.

    Why a large image sensor? Many may wonder why worry about a large image sensor in the first place. A big reason, at least for me, is being able to achieve a shallower depth of field. With a larger image sensor, a longer focal length lens can be used to achieve the same effective focal length, which will translate into a shallower depth of field at the same aperture value. Also, many will argue image quality can, and usually does, go up with physically larger image sensors.

    Here's a video Sony put together on the new RX100. Check it out. We should have the RX100 in late July.

  • Nissin Flash Compatibility Chart

    If you haven't heard of Nissin, they are a popular third-party flash manufacturer that manufactures flashes for use with Canon, Nikon, Sony, and more. Nissin offers high-quality alternatives to the original equipment manufacturer's flashes and replicates many of the same functions including TTL, plus Nissin adds some additional features not found in OEM flashes (like a color, auto-rotating display on the 866), and does all this at a discount to the comparable OEM model.

    Not all Nissin flashes are fully compatible with all cameras, however. There may be some limitations depending on your flash and camera combination. Nissin recently sent us an updated compatibility chart, and we thought it would be useful if we published it here:

    Nissin Flash Compatibility Chart

    We offer the full line of Nissin flashes in our retail store. If you have any questions regarding Nissin flashes, or would like to order one, please don't hesitate to contact us at sales@gmcamera.com or (802) 244-0883.

  • Sony Introduces SLT-A37 Digital SLR, NEX-F3 Mirrorless Camera, and Two New Lenses

    Sony Introduces Speedy α37 Camera with Full-time Continuous AF Powered by Translucent Mirror Technology

    Sony Alpha SLT-A37 Digital SLR Camera

    New Model Features High-Quality 16.1MP APS-C Image Sensor, up to 7 fps Shooting, High- Resolution Electronic Viewfinder and more

    SAN DIEGO, May 16, 2012 – Lightweight, easy to use and packed with a variety of useful features, the new Sony SLT-A37 camera is an ideal choice for consumers eager to explore the world of interchangeable lens DSLR photography.

    The new Sony α37 digital SLR camera is the latest to feature Sony’s acclaimed Translucent Mirror Technology, which delivers a potent combination of fast shooting, non-stop phase detection autofocus and continuous live image preview during still and full HD video (60i/24p) shooting.  This innovative technology also allows the new Sony α37 camera to grab split-second action with a burst of sharply focused images.  Shots can be captured at up to seven frames per second in Tele-Zoom High Speed Shooting Mode, where the central portion of the sensor’s image is magnified by approximately 1.4x.

    The Sony a37 camera has a precision 3-cross 15-point AF system with tracking autofocus that keeps faces and fast-moving subjects in sharp focus.  From action-packed sports to spontaneous family portraits, it will ensure that all the drama and beauty of that special moment is captured.

    “Delivering lightning-fast shooting speeds and autofocus plus advanced full HD video capture, our innovative Translucent Mirror Technology continues to serve as the backbone of our A-mount line of cameras,” said Mike Kahn, director of the Alpha business at Sony.  “Featuring this unique technology plus a host of exciting new features and an attractive price tag, our new α37 camera brings a whole new meaning to the term ‘entry level DSLR’.”

    Framing and focusing is easy with the Sony a37 camera’s high-resolution Tru-Finder™ electronic viewfinder.  With a high 1440k dot resolution, excellent contrast and 100% field of view, it matches or exceeds the abilities of many optical viewfinders.  Adjustments to exposure and other creative picture settings can be previewed in real time, either via the Tru-Finder™ EVF or the tilt-angle 6.7 cm (2.7") Clear Photo™ LCD screen, making it easy to create shots with a customized, professional finish.

    Additionally, the Sony α37 camera helps inexperienced photographers create top-quality portraits with ease.  The new Auto Portrait Framing mode identifies the subject’s position in a composed image and follows the “rule of thirds” to trim the scene and create a beautifully framed portrait.  The cropped photo is then boosted to full resolution using Sony’s unique By Pixel Super Resolution technology, which uses pattern matching to maintain superb image detail, tones and textures in the photo.   Both the original and cropped image files are saved for review.

    By Pixel Super Resolution Technology is also used for the “Clear Image Zoom” feature, which digitally doubles the effective magnification of any lens attached to the camera. Ideal for travel and everyday shooting, it’s a great way to boost maximum focal length without carrying extra hardware.

    The 16.1 effective megapixel Exmor® APS HD CMOS sensor inside the Sony α37 camera captures finely detailed, low noise stills and Full HD video. It’s teamed with the latest BIONZ® image processor that extends sensitivity to an ISO 100-16000 range, broadening options for low-light shooting without flash.  Shared with all α A-mount cameras, SteadyShot INSIDE™ stabilization cuts the effects of camera shake by up to 4.0 stops for clearer handheld images with any A-mount lens.

    The new Sony α37 camera also features Superior Auto Mode, which intelligently recognizes a wide range of scenes and subjects and adjusts settings automatically.

    The new Sony α37 digital camera will be available this June with an 18-55mm kit zoom lens (model SEL1855) for about $600.

    Sony Alpha SLT-A37 Digital SLR Camera Front

    Sony Alpha SLT-A37 Digital SLR Camera RearSony Alpha SLT-A37 Digital SLR Camera Lens Mount

    Sony Alpha SLT-A37 Digital SLR Camera Top

    Sony Alpha SLT-A37 Digital SLR Camera Left SideSony Alpha SLT-A37 Digital SLR Camera Right Side

    New Sony A-Mount 18-135mm Telephoto Zoom Lens (SAL18135)

    Sony SAL18135 A-Mount 18-135mm Lens

    A versatile match for the Sony α37 and other Sony A-mount camera bodies, the new SAL18135 18-135mm F3.5-5.6 telephoto zoom lens offers a generous 8x (approx.) zoom range in a compact, go-anywhere lens that’s great for travel, street photography and everyday shooting.  The lens features a SAM design that assures smooth, rapid, whisper-quiet autofocus operation and Direct Manual Focus for accurate fine-tuning of focus.  This sharp telephoto zoom lens will also be offered as a kit lens with the Sony α37 and other Sony A-mount camera bodies.

    The new Sony SAL18135 telephoto zoom lens will be available as a stand-alone product this July for about $500, and will be offered as a kit lens with other Sony A-mount cameras beginning this August.

    Sony’s New α (Alpha) NEX-F3 Camera Packs DSLR-Size Sensor and Advanced Feature Set into Small, Stylish Body

    Sony NEX-F3 Mirrorless Digital Interchangeable Lens Camera

    Lightweight Model Features 16.1 Megapixel APS-C Sensor, 180° Tiltable LCD, Built-in Flash, Auto Portrait Framing and more

    SAN DIEGO, May 16, 2012 – Sony’s α NEX-F3 digital camera delivers professional quality photos with a compact, pocket-sized body, allowing consumers to explore the creative world of high-quality, interchangeable lens photography in a refreshingly fun and entertaining way.

    The new Sony NEX-F3 camera features the same space-saving mirrorless design as other models in Sony’s E-mount family as well as an advanced, 16.1 effective megapixel Exmor™ APS HD CMOS sensor, identical in size to sensors found in traditional DSLR cameras.   The large sensor of the Sony NEX-F3 takes in more light during image capture, resulting in flawless, low-noise photographs and crisply detailed Full HD videos (60i/24p).  Photographers can also easily create images with beautiful defocus effects, where the subject is focused sharply against a smoothly blurred background.

    “Sony continues to redefine digital photography with our E-mount series, packing a large APS-C size sensor into a small, lightweight camera body to produce professional-quality images with ease,” said Mike Kahn, director of the Alpha business at Sony.  “Featuring a diverse set of imaging technologies and offered at a great price, the new Sony NEX-F3 model reinforces our commitment to this rapidly growing compact system camera market."

    The Sony NEX-F3 camera adds a whole new perspective to self-portraits with a 180° Tiltable LCD screen, a first for Sony’s E-mount camera line.  By simply holding the camera at arm’s length and flipping the LCD screen vertically, users can adjust the on-screen preview image and properly frame photos.

    Additionally, the new model features a useful built-in flash to broaden shooting options indoors or in low light situations.  Already introduced on Sony’s acclaimed NEX-7 camera, this pop-up flash handily brightens portraits and other shots without the need to carry an additional flash accessory.

    The new Sony NEX-F3 camera also includes the new Auto Portrait Framing feature for creating top-quality portraits quickly and easily.   This innovative feature identifies a subject’s position in a composed image, and follows the “rule of thirds” to trim the scene appropriately around the subject’s face, creating a beautifully composed portrait.  The cropped portrait is then boosted to full resolution using Sony’s unique By Pixel Super Resolution technology, which uses pattern matching to maintain superb image detail, tones and textures in the photo.   Both the original and cropped image files are saved for review.

    By Pixel Super Resolution Technology is also used for the “Clear Image Zoom” feature, which digitally doubles the effective magnification of any lens attached to the camera. Ideal for travel and everyday shooting, it’s a great way to boost maximum focal length without carrying extra hardware.

    Other convenient essentials added to the new Sony NEX-F3 camera include the Superior Auto mode,  which intelligently recognizes a wide range of scenes and subjects and adjusts settings automatically. Battery stamina has been boosted to an industry-leading 470 shots (approx.) on a single charge – an approximate 18% improvement over its predecessor, the NEX-C3 model.

    The camera is compatible with the FDA-EV1S viewfinder accessory (sold separately), which offers a high-contrast, high-resolution OLED viewfinder display and a wide viewing angle.  The Sony NEX-F3 model also features a high-quality, premium-feel grip for more comfortable handling and can be charged via either USB or a standard AC outlet.

    The new NEX-F3 compact digital camera will be available this June in silver, black and white with an 18-55mm kit zoom lens (model SEL1855) for about $600.

    Sony Alpha NEX-F3 Mirrorless Digital Interchangeable Lens Camera Front

    Sony Alpha NEX-F3 Mirrorless Digital Interchangeable Lens Camera Back

    Sony Alpha NEX-F3 Mirrorless Digital Interchangeable Lens Camera Lifestyle

    New Lightweight 18-200mm Telephoto Zoom Lens for Sony α (Alpha) NEX (SEL18200LE)

    Sony SEL18200LE 18-200mm E-Mount Lens

    An ideal travel partner for the Sony NEX-F3 camera, the new Sony SEL18200LE E-mount 18-200mm F3.5-6.3 OSS LE telezoom lens offers a powerful 11x zoom range and superb resolution in an easy-to-carry package.  Smaller and 12% lighter than the SEL18200 lens, the new E-mount model features Optical SteadyShot to compensate for the effects of hand-shake.  It also features Direct Manual Focus to give users precise control over focus settings, resulting in crisp, beautiful images.

    The new SEL18200LE telezoom lens will be available this July in black for about $850.

  • Nikon D4 Includes Sony XQD 16GB Memory Card and Reader (for now)

    Nikon D4 Includes Sony XQD 16GB Memory Card and Reader

    A lot of customers have heard rumors that the new Nikon D4 is shipping with Sony XQD cards and readers included, and have been asking us if this is true. We can confirm that this is, indeed, true! Some have wondered if these freebies were only included with Nikon Professional Services (NPS) shipments of the Nikon D4. We can also confirm that we have already received both NPS and non-NPS shipments of the new Nikon D4, and they have all included the 16GB XQD cards and card readers. We aren't sure if--or how long--this will continue, but, for now, we'll take it!

  • Nikon D3X vs. Sony A77 ISO Comparison

    Sony SLT-A77 and Nikon D3X Side-by-Side

    Sony A77 and Nikon D3X

    You might be wondering why we would want to compare the Sony A77 and Nikon D3X in terms of ISO performance. A better match might be to compare the Sony A900 to the Nikon D3X. After all, it is rumored the D3X uses a sensor manufactured by Sony. Considering that, and both the A900 and the D3X are 24 megapixel (plus some change) full-frame cameras, one might conclude those are the two cameras to compare. And, especially when you realize the A900 retails for $2700 and the D3X retails for $8000. So, you are probably still wondering, why the A77 and D3X?

    Well, the Sony A77, like the D3X for Nikon when it first came out, is the first camera of its kind. It has a 24 megapixel (plus some change) APS-C sized (1.5x crop) sensor. A lot of people are weary of packing more pixels into a sensor without increasing the sensor size at the same time. The idea is that if each pixel, or photosite, is smaller it will likely get bombarded with more photons of light than a larger photosite in a given amount of time. Oppositely, the smaller photosite is like a "net" and, being a smaller net, it is less likely to capture as many photons in a given instance. So, if you have a lot of light the smaller photosites will get saturated and turn white, and if you don't have much light the photosites will stay dark. Either way, you will have a loss of detail: blown out highlights, and blocked shadows. This may also translate into a noisier or "grainier" image at higher ISOs.

    Our fascination and the reason for comparing these two cameras is to see how the APS-C 24 megapixel sensor of the $1400 Sony A77 compares to the full-frame 24 megapixel sensor of the $8000 D3X. The full-frame size of the 24 megapixel D3X means each individual pixel is physically larger than the pixels of the A77. This means the D3X may likely have greater dynamic range in capturing scenes with more contrast than the A77, but that kind of comparison is not our goal here. We wanted to strictly take a look at the noise levels/sharpness of each.

    Please see the following comparison shots below. We set up a quick scene and shot both cameras with similar settings, changing only the ISO in between each shot. As we used Aperture Priority mode, the exposure evaluation was up to each individual camera. In addition, we shot both cameras at their highest-level JPG setting. How these cameras handle JPG processing may be very different, and seeing the RAW images from these cameras may be a lot different than what you see here. We have included 100% crops, side-by-side. We won't tell you which one was shot by the Sony A77 and which was shot by the Nikon D3x, until you get to the bottom. Which do you think are the A77 images, and which do you think are the D3X?

    Nikon D3X vs. Sony A77 ISO Comparison

    ISO 400

    Nikon D3X vs. Sony A77 ISO Comparison

    ISO 800

    Nikon D3X vs. Sony A77 ISO Comparison

    ISO 1600

    Nikon D3X vs. Sony A77 ISO Comparison

    ISO 3200

    Nikon D3X vs. Sony A77 ISO Comparison

    ISO 6400

    OK, so you are probably wondering which is which? Or, maybe you've already figured it out. The left side of each image is from the Nikon D3X, and the right side of each image is from the Sony A77. We noticed the D3X tends to look sharper (at least in the brush), but at the expense of more noise or "grain". The A77 images look less noisy/grainy at higher ISOs, but it looks like you can't pick out as many bristles in the brush. What do you notice? Which one do you think looks better overall?

  • First Look at the Sony E-Mount 50mm f/1.8 OSS Lens (SEL50F18)

    We recently discussed Sony's plans for expanding the E-mount lineup of lenses for Sony's NEX camera system. At the time of this discussion the Sony E-mount 50mm f/1.8 OSS (Optical SteadyShot Stabilization) lens had already been announced. Now, at that time, although the 50mm f/1.8 had been announced, it had not yet been released and shipped. We just received our first shipment of the Sony E-mount 50mm f/1.8 OSS lens a few days ago, and were curious how it performed. We decided to slap it on a Sony NEX-7 and take the 50mm f/1.8 for a stroll.

    Sony 50mm f/1.8 OSS lens on Sony NEX-7 Digital Camera

    Sony E-mount 50mm f/1.8 mounted on Sony NEX-7

    Sony 50mm f/1.8 Build and Construction

    The Sony E-Mount 50mm f/1.8 OSS lens construction feels solid, and the design is minimal and elegant. The lens has a good weight in the hand, and it feels like Sony used a good amount of metal in the construction. Although this lens is more expensive than 50mm f/1.8 lenses from other manufacturers, the construction feels nicer than some of those other lenses. Where other manufacturers are building lenses with plastic lens mounts to cut costs, Sony's 50mm f/1.8 has a metal bayonet mount. This is nice to see as many of our customers's lens repairs involve broken plastic bayonet lens mounts. The focus ring is set flush in the lens barrel, but still gnarled with a good feel for accurate manual focusing.

    The first thing that struck us was the size of the lens. This 50mm f/1.8 lens is larger than similar lenses from other manufacturers. The Sony 50mm f/1.8 is approximately the same size as the Sony E-mount 18-55mm zoom lens.

    Sony 50mm f/1.8 and 18-55mm zoom lenses side-by-side

    50mm f/1.8 and 18-55mm lenses side-by-side

    The size of the lens is a little perplexing considering that it is designed for the Sony NEX camera system, which are small cameras by design.

    Nikon 50mm f/1.8 compared to Sony E-mount 50mm f/1.8

    Compared to Nikon 50mm f/1.8

    Sony 50mm f/1.8 Image Samples

    The Sony E-Mount 50mm f/1.8 lens and the Sony NEX-7 make for a great pair. Except for a slow, hunt-and-peck autofocus in low-light or dark subjects, the image quality is superb. The Sony 50mm f/1.8 is able to take advantage of the high, 24 megapixel count of the NEX-7. Take a look at the image of Charlie below:

    Sample of Charlie taken with the Sony E-Mount 50mm f/1.8 OSS Lens and NEX-7

    If you zoom in on the eye and take a look at the image at 100% , the detail is all there:

    Cropped image sample of Sony 50mm f/1.8 and NEX-7

    100% crop of eye

    Sony NEX camera users have been waiting for an affordable, fast-aperture lens. The Zeiss 24mm f/1.8 was the first to come out, but at $1000 is a little out of reach for most users. In addition, the Zeiss 24mm is a wide-angle lens, and, although good for low-light, does not make a good lens for portraits. The Sony 50mm f/1.8 is effectively a 75mm lens on the current NEX cameras, and, therefore, makes for a better portrait lens. The fast F1.8 aperture creates nice, soft out-of-focus backgrounds:

    Sony 50mm f/1.8 OSS Lens Image Sample with out-of-focus background

    Although the 50mm f/1.8 has a fairly close focus of 1.28 feet, it is not a macro lens. The above image was cropped from its original composition to make this image look like a macro shot. The 24 megapixel NEX-7 sensor provides plenty of resolution to be able to crop images, even this close.

    The Optical SteadyShot Stabilization in conjunction with the fast F1.8 aperture allows for hand-held, low-light shooting:

    Sony E-Mount 50mm f/1.8 OSS low-light image sample
    Sony E-Mount 50mm f/1.8 OSS low-light image sample

    Sony E-Mount 50mm f/1.8 OSS low-light image sample

    Even in low-light and hand-held, the Sony 50mm f/1.8 is able to produce sharp images with the NEX-7:

    Sony E-Mount 50mm f/1.8 OSS low-light image sample detail

    Here are some other images taken with the Sony E-mount 50mm f/1.8 OSS lens on the Sony NEX-7:

    Sony E-Mount 50mm f/1.8 OSS image sample
    Sony E-Mount 50mm f/1.8 OSS image sample
    Sony E-Mount 50mm f/1.8 OSS image sample
    Sony E-Mount 50mm f/1.8 OSS image sample

  • Sony Announces E-Mount Lens Expansion, Promises 5 New Lenses

    Sony E-Mount Lens Roadmap

    Click image for larger view

    Sony has announced intentions to grow their E-mount (Sony Alpha NEX Cameras) lens assortment significantly over the next two years, and plans to offer a total of  15 E-mount lenses in market by the end of 2013.   For those doing the math, that amounts to 8 new lenses in addition to the 7 currently offered.  Though official specs of the new lenses have yet to be released, we are able to share what Sony intends to offer for these 5 new lenses:

    2012

    1.  High-Magnification Zoom Lens
    2. Standard Zoom Lens
    3. Large Aperture, Standard Fixed-Focal Length Lens

    2013

    1. Mid-Magnification Zoom Lens
    2. Snap, Pancake Fixed-Focal Length Lens

    Any guesses on specifics? Check the chart above to see what is already being offered to help fill in the blanks.

     

  • Update: Availability of Sony A77, A65, NEX-5N, NEX-7 and New Lenses

    As noted in our previous post comparing the features of the Sony A77 and Sony A65, we have received a lot of interest in the new Sony cameras and lenses that were recently announced: Sony A77, A65, NEX-5N, NEX-7, SAL1650, SEL24F18Z, SEL50F18, and the SEL55210. A lot of the interest has been a curiosity in when these new products will be made available. We were able to get a release schedule from Sony, and we are providing this information here. Each item links to our website where you will be able to purchase the items when we receive them in stock. If you would like to pre-order an item to be one of the first to receive the product, please contact us at sales@gmcamera.com, or (802) 244-0883. All pre-orders are first come, first serve. We currently have all of these products on order with Sony, and will therefore be part of the first shipments as the products are released.

    Release Schedule for Sony A77, A65, NEX-5N, NEX-7, and New Lenses

    Sony NEX-5N Body Only (Black) First Week of September
    Sony NEX-5N 18-55mm Lens Kit (Black) First Week of September
    Sony NEX-5N 18-55mm Lens Kit (Silver) First Week of September
    Sony Alpha SLT-A65 Body Only Mid-to-Late October
    Sony Alpha SLT-A65 18-55mm Lens Kit Mid-to-Late October
    Sony Alpha SLT-A77 Body Only Mid-to-Late October
    Sony Alpha SLT-A77 16-50mm f/2.8 Lens Kit Mid-to-Late October
    Sony NEX-7 Body Only Early November
    Sony NEX-7 18-55mm Lens Kit Early November
    Sony DT 16-50mm f/2.8 SSM Lens (SAL1650) Early November
    Carl Zeiss Sonnar T* E 24mm f/1.8 Lens (SEL24F18Z) Early December
    Sony E 50mm f/1.8 OSS Lens (SEL50F18) Mid December
    Sony E 55-210mm f/4.5-6.3 OSS Lens (SEL55210) Mid-to-Late October
  • Sony Alpha A65 and A77 Feature Comparison

    We recently reported on Sony's introduction of the Alpha SLT-A65 and Alpha SLT-A77. That post has received a lot of interest and we have already started to receive a lot of questions. A question that we are hearing again and again is "What are the main differences between the A65 and the A77?"  We decided there has been enough interest and enough people asking this question that we should just post the main differences here.

    Sony Alpha A65 and A77 Feature ComparisonOne big factor that differentiates the two cameras is the pre-packaged kit lens. The A65 is available as body only or with the Sony 18-55mm lens as a kit. The A77 is also offered as body only, but is also offered with the new 16-50mm f/2.8 lens as a kit. That difference alone may be appealing for some customers to decide one way or the other, and there is a big difference in price to support that decision. The A65 body is $900, and the kit is $1000. The A77 body is $1400 and the kit is $2000. Customers who already have a strong investment in Sony and Minolta glass may not care too much, and will opt for the body only approach. If you are interested in the A77 and acquiring the new 16-50mm f/2.8, the kit is $100 less than buying the lens and body separately (the lens as a standalone purchase is $700).

    Certainly there are more differences than just that:

    A65 A77
    Strong Polycarbonate Body Magnesium Alloy Body with Moisture & Dust Resistance
    Up to 10 FPS with AF In Speed Priority AE Up to 12 FPS with AF In Speed Priority AE
    2-Way Tilt TruBlack LCD 3-Way Tilt TruBlack LCD
    15-point AF; 3-cross type 19-point AF;11-cross Type
    Single Front Dial & Function Button Front & Rear Dials, top LCD Panel, Multi-direction Control Stick & Function Button
    1/4000th Sec. Top Shutter Speed
    1/160th Sec. Flash Sync Speed
    1/8000th Sec. Top Shutter Speed
    1/250th Sec. Flash Sync Speed
    + / - 3.0 EV + / - 5.0 EV
    Optional Vertical Grip
    DMF Direct Manual Focus Function
    Programmable 3 Memory Recall Function
    PC Flash Sync Post

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