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  • Nikon School 2-Day HD-SLR Video Multimedia Workshop, May 5-6

    Ever wonder how to get the most from your HD video enabled digital SLR camera?

    The Nikon School is hosting a full-spectrum 2-day HD DSLR Multimedia Workshop in downtown Boston. Attendees will be provided with loaner cameras, gear, and Apple laptops for editing. The workshop is May 5th and 6th, and will include classroom instruction, real-world shooting, and basic editing. You'll also learn tips for capturing audio. The workshop is limited to 20 students and costs $599. You can register at nikonschool.com/teach.

    Nikon School HD DSLR Multimedia Workshop

  • "Femto Photography": Born in a Lab at MIT

    MIT Media Lab's Camera Culture Group has developed a process for visualizing light at a trillion frames per second. The name? "Femto Photography". This seems like something sports photographers could really get behind. Perhaps sifting through a trillion frames of images for a one second moment would be a little too tedious. Even the most patient editors would have a difficult time with that one. Of course, yes, we know it wouldn't be possible in the first place. An exposure time of 1/1,000,000,000,000 seconds is a little too short for a moving subject to be properly exposed. It is still fun to think about, however.

    In all seriousness, this is way cool. Visualizing the propagation of waves through water is one thing, but being able to visualize the propagation of light is something else. Check out the video below. It shows pulses of a laser and the light emitted and propagated from that pulse. It takes approximately one-billionth of a second for the light to travel across the entire bottle. Slowed down, it takes a little bit longer than that....

  • Sekonic to host a Live Online Video Seminar August 11th, 2011

    Sekonic Live Online Video SeminarSekonic just notified us of an upcoming live video seminar to be hosted 8/11/2011 at 1:00pm (EDT) on the Sekonic website. We think this is a great (FREE!) opportunity to pick up some new information, tips, and/or tricks. Sekonic provides the following description for this seminar:

    Log on August 11 at 1:00pm (EDT) for a free one-hour live seminar, hosted by noted photographer and educator Joe Brady. You'll have a front-row seat from the comfort of your home or office as you participate in our interactive streaming-video seminar broadcast in real time here on this page. In this session, we will explore common lighting situations that can occur when shooting outside, along with easy-to-follow solutions that give you the quality you want for your environmental portraits.

    Sekonic continues with the following information about what will be specifically covered:

    Creating portraits on location can be a great way to have both flattering light and beautiful surroundings to complement your subject. The place you and your client choose can help tell a story that says something about what is important to them.

    All of this sounds wonderful, but there’s a problem here as well. Many times, the light and cast shadows are not particularly flattering on your subject. Sometimes the problems are obvious and sometimes they are subtle, but to create a quality portrait, these are issues that have to be dealt with.

    In this session, we’ll explore a few common lighting situations that can occur when shooting outside, and we'll offer you some easy-to-follow solutions that can help you solve these challenges. We’ll explore ways to overcome problem lighting with tools that are simple and effective, and we’ll use a handheld light meter to provide us with all the information we need to control and shape the light in beautiful environmental portraits.

    In case you missed part 1 of the series (Control the Light and Improve Your Photography:
    Part I – Portraiture using Available Light), we have posted it here for your convenience:

  • Memory Card Myths Demystefied

    The good people at SanDisk recently sent us some information about memory cards. There are a lot of myths surrounding memory cards, and certainly a lot of confusion when it comes to SD cards and differences in speeds, and those speeds when thinking of taking stills vs. video.

    We've copied the document SanDisk provided to us for you here. We hope it helps in demystifying any confusion you may currently have about memory cards.

    Memory Myths – Clear the Clutter
    The basic concept

    Think about a memory card as if it is a sponge. The data from your camera is a glass of water. Three basic principles govern the relationship between the sponge (card) and the water (data).

    Card capacity – how much water (data) can the sponge absorb
    Write speed of the card – how quickly can the sponge (card) absorb the water (data), expressed in MBS (MegaBytes per Second)
    Read speed of the card – how quickly can I wring out the sponge (card) once it’s full of water (data), also expressed in MBS (MegaBytes per Second)

    1. All cards are created equal
    False.

    SanDisk is one only of six prime manufacturers of flash memory wafers in the world, and we are the leader in flash memory cards. In addition to manufacturing our own flash, we also manufacture our own controllers (the “traffic cop” under the hood that determines where data gets written on the flash). Our controller technology reduces the likelihood that any one sector wears out prematurely, so the life of the card is maximized, and bottom line – you come home with your pictures and/ or video content.

    We also write the code that allows all the components to communicate and we do our own assembly and rigorous quality control testing. This is not the case with some other brands of flash cards on the market.

    2. Class is relevant to all performance in all types of memory cards – both for still and video.
    False.

    There are a few measurements of speed for flash cards, just like you can measure the speed of a car in both miles per hour and kilometers per hour.

    There are two measures of speed for CompactFlash cards – MBS (megabytes per second) and the “X” factor.

    Example: our Extreme CompactFlash cards are both 60MBS and 400X. These numbers represent the rate at which data can be transferred from/ to the card and host device (camera/ camcorder). If you know the MBS number (in this case 60MBS), you simply divide that number by .15, so in this case:
    60MBS/ .15 = 400X
    Conversely, if you know the “X factor, you can easily calculate the MBS:
    400X x .15 = 60MBS

    It’s a little more complicated with SDHC cards where there are three measures of speed. Let’s take an Extreme 30MBS, 200X, Class 6 card as an example. The same relationship between MBS (megabytes per second) and the “X” factor applies to SDHC as to CompactFlash:
    30MBS/ .15 = 200X

    In addition to the MBS and “X” factor, SDHC cards are also designated with a Class rating (typically Class 4, 6, or 10). The Class rating system is ONLY relevant when shooting full 1080P HD video onto SDHC cards. It is not applicable to CompactFlash cards and is NOT relevant to still photography when using SDHC cards. By definition, Class is the MINIMUM sustained read/ write speed of an SDHC card expressed in MegaBytes per Second (or MBS). The Class system was developed when flash based video came into vogue a few years ago, as a means to ensure the end result would be a drop-out free
    video when viewed on your television or PC. For example:
    -your camera manual specs a Class 6 card for shooting 1080P video
    This means you need a card with a minimum sustained write speed of 6MBS (megabytes per second) to ensure proper video quality from your camera/ camcorder.

    In addition, the Class rating is the MINIMUM video recording speed of the card, not the maximum performance (speed) of the card. SanDisk Extreme SDHC cards (ideal for video and still photography) run at a MINIMUM of 6MBS for video recording, and a MAXIMUM of 20MBS for burst shooting. Bottom line – not all Class 6 cards are created equal and the Class rating is only relevant to SDHC cards and only applicable to shooting 1080P HD video.

    3. The speed of a card is more important when shooting video vs. still photography.
    False.

    When recording video, you are shooting a small, but sustained stream of data onto a card (a garden hose). When you are shooting RAW files (still photography) at a burst rate of 5 or 6FPS, you are sending a 10 – 20 megabyte file (based on your particular camera brand/ model) onto a card 5 or 6 times per second (like aiming a fire hose at your memory card).

    4. CompactFlash cards are “professional” and more durable than SD cards.
    False.

    CompactFlash was the first form factor to the market and was the mainstay in digital
    photography for about 5 years. SD cards were developed to allow more compact camera designs, but they are actually more durable than CompactFlash cards because:
    -they are truly waterproof, shockproof, magnet and x-ray proof*

    5. SDXC cards are faster than SDHC cards.
    False.

    By definition:
    0 – 2 gigabytes = SD Card
    2+ - 32 gigabytes = SDHC Card
    32+ gigabytes = SDXC Card
    SDXC is simply a measure of a cards’s CAPACITY, not speed.

    *Up to 32GB capacity (refer to http://www.sandisk.com/about-sandisk/proof)

    If you are looking to purchase new memory, or upgrade the memory you have, please visit our website here:

    Green Mountain Camera : Photo Accessories : Memory Cards

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